As the Story Is Told: Along the Lake, Part 4: Treasure in Morpeth

As the Story is told: A history of Morpeth and communityEvery week, I share an excerpt from my Great Aunt’s book, As the Story is Told: A History of Morpeth and Community, which was printed in 1986.

…Continued from last week…

cottages

cottages near the old Hill Dock on Lake Erie

Treaure in Morpeth

by Gordon Watson

During World War 1, three men came from Toronto and found, it is presumed, gold buried in the ravine east of Morpeth. These men came to the farm of Wilbur Scane and stated that they had information that a chest of money, or gold, had been buried in the basement of an old building or mill, long since destroyed, situated on the bank of the creek. They said they would share one-quarter of the money, if they found any, with Mr. Scane if he would give them permission to dig for it.

 This permission was granted and the men produced maps and blueprints and began marking out a course and setting stakes.

With nightfall it was impossible for them to continue and the men explained one of them would have to return to Toronto and they couldn’t continue digging till he returned.

The following morning Mr. Scane found a large hole about seven feet by four feet dug in the side of the ravine, but across the creek from where the Toronto men said the treasure was. The foundations of brick and stone showed what appeared to be the cellar of an old building.

Whether they found treasure or not no one knows.

[The information in this chapter was taken from two articles in the Windsor Daily Star. One of the articles was in an April 1938 edition, and was written by Ray Hubbell. The other was written by Lyle Thackeray and appeared in a December 1954 edition.]

Advertisements

One thought on “As the Story Is Told: Along the Lake, Part 4: Treasure in Morpeth

  1. Pingback: As the Story is Told: Along the Lake, Part 3: Gold in Lake Erie | The Farmhouse Chronicles

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s