As the Story is Told: Morpeth Newspapers

This week’s excerpt from “As the Story is Told” (1986)

Morpeth Newspapers

In the records five different names of Morpeth newspapers appear during the period of 1852 to 1874. Some of these could very likely be nothing more than new ownerships. Excerpts from each of these papers follow.

Morpeth Weekly Tribune

A copy of No. 1 Vol. 1 of a newspaper called “The Morpeth Weekly Tribune” which bears the dateline “Morpeth, Canada West, Wednesday November 17, 1852” is a four-page paper. The advertising is mainly of Chatham and Detroit firms.
The Morpeth matter in the paper is confined to about three columns, mostly editorial matter. Following is one of the editorials.

MORPETH

The beautiful and healthy village of Morpeth on the Great Talbot Street and adjacent to Lake Erie, has a population of nearly six hundred inhabitants, comprising three eminent physicians, Doctors Wallen, Rolls and Proudfoot, the two former keeping drugstores and the latter making his residence at the hotel of Mr. John L. Smith. We have also well filled stores kept by Messrs. William Wilson, A. Laidlaw, Thomas McCollum, T. Findlay, James Nation and G. W. King all of whom drive a profitable business, and the great part of them rich and out of debt.

We have three superior hotels kept by Messrs. Robert Buller, James Caswell, and John L. Smith, whose tables and bars are supplied with every comfort and luxury required for the accommodation of the public generally; as well as honest and trusty hostlers to render justice in their arduous duties.

We also have in Morpeth two livery stables kept by Messrs. H.B. and J. A. Caswell and Robert Buller, where carriages, one horse wagon, saddle horses, etc., can be had at all times and upon reasonable terms.

Also two cabinet-maker’s shops, excellent in their way and not inferior to what can be found in larger towns and cities in Western Canada. The proprietor of one Mr. James Davis; that of the other Mr. Hiram Bell. Three carpenter shops carried on by Messrs. John Addeman, Wm. Nash, and Bartholomew Vanvaultingburgh, excellent mechanics who merit and receive a good support. Three shoemaker’s shops, who, like the other master mechanics in our little rising town, employ several respectable tradesmen. Mr. James Taylor’s shop is one door west of Buller’s Hotel, that of Mr. W. McClure adjacent to McLeod’s Merchant Tailor’s Store, the shop of Mr. J. Cain one door east of Caswell’s Hotel. We have two Saddler’s shops, to wit Messrs. Geo. Wood and James Caddy; they both do what the Yankees would call a smashing business and no doubt deserve the patronage they receive as both shops appear full of good work and assistants. In Morpeth we have two butcher shops who also manufacture candles to throw a light upon “The Tribune.” Mssrs. Isaac Pentice and Son own one establishment, Mrs. Thos. Addamman and Son the other. Both “bosses” are generally respected for their honesty and straight forward dealing.

We have two tailor’s shops, one kept by Mr. Richard Jones, the other by Mr. A. McLeod, merchant tailor and general outfitting establishment where clothes can be purchased as cheap as elsewhere; as well as the outer man dressed to perfection upon reasonable terms. Give me a call and let our readers judge for themselves and not take the opinion of “The Morpeth Tribune.”

This is a copy of an article published in the Ridgetown Dominion from a “Tribune” found in a home in the district some years ago.

…previous section…

…next section…

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “As the Story is Told: Morpeth Newspapers

  1. Pingback: As the Story is Told: Stage Coach | The Farmhouse Chronicles

  2. Pingback: As the Story is Told: Morpeth Newspapers II | The Farmhouse Chronicles

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s